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Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Factor demand in irrigated agriculture under conditions of restricted water supplies found in the catalog.

Factor demand in irrigated agriculture under conditions of restricted water supplies

Daniel J. Bernardo

Factor demand in irrigated agriculture under conditions of restricted water supplies

by Daniel J. Bernardo

  • 36 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, ERS-NASS [distributor, 1989] in [Washington, DC], Rockville, MD .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Irrigation efficiency -- Northwest, Pacific.,
  • Irrigation scheduling -- Northwest, Pacific.,
  • Irrigation farming -- Economic aspects -- Northwest, Pacific.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDaniel J. Bernardo, Norman K. Whittlesey.
    SeriesTechnical bulletin -- no. 1765., Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 1765.
    ContributionsWhittlesey, Norman K., United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 13 p. :
    Number of Pages13
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17679067M

    The watershed comprises an area of about one million acres of irrigated agriculture in the eastern San Joaquin Valley. The Order also establishes a model for all regional water boards to follow in their subsequent orders to reduce pollutants from irrigated agriculture around the State. wells were increasing. More than 25 percent of the state's population was served by water with concentrations of nitrate above 22 milligrams per liter (as NO 3).Similar increases were noted in detections of pesticides in public water supplies; about 27 percent of the population was periodically consuming low concentrations of pesticides in their drinking water.

    Rural Agricultural Drinking-water Supply Guideline 3 2 The Rural Agricultural Drinking-water Supply Guideline Options to comply The Drinking-water Standards for New Zealand set different criteria for the different sizes and types of drinking-water supplies. The result is that, under such conditions, when available supplies are highly deficient, irrigation decisions are governed more by crop and irrigation system-related factors than by the soil-water avail- ability. However, when supplies approach adequate levels, irrigation frequen- cies rise and Wo influences the timing of irrigations by:

    Water for agriculture, aquaculture and fisheries must be available in large quantities and good quality to achieve and maintain harvests. Rain is the most useful source of . Mediterranean Basin Italy, Greece and Morocco Introduction The European Environment Agency (EEA) contends that water use in agriculture is unsustainable in many parts of southern Europe. A contributing factor is that current regulatory and pricing mechanisms ‘have failed to manage [and reduce] demand’ In a recent report, the EEAFile Size: 3MB.


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Factor demand in irrigated agriculture under conditions of restricted water supplies by Daniel J. Bernardo Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Factor demand in irrigated agriculture under conditions of restricted water supplies. [Daniel J Bernardo; Norman K Whittlesey; United States. Department of Agriculture.

Economic Research Service.]. Agriculture is a major user of ground and surface water in the United States, accounting for approximately 80 percent of the Nation's consumptive water use and over 90 percent in many Western States. Efficient irrigation systems and water management practices can help maintain farm profitability in an era of increasingly limited and more costly water supplies.

Changes in environmental conditions can also significantly influence water supply and demand. Increased precipitation or decreased evapotranspiration are likely to augment water supplies and reduce the water demanded by irrigated agriculture. Increases in temperature or decreases in vegetated area or biological diversity are likely to diminish.

Inirrigated agriculture made a significant contribution to the value of U.S. agricultural production, with farms having at least some irrigated cropland accounting for roughly 40 percent of U.S.

agricultural market sales. The 17 contiguous Western States accounted for nearly three-quarters of U.S. irrigated farmland during the period. Water logging is a universal problem of irrigated agriculture and it is a serious threat to the sustainability of irrigated agriculture in many arid and semiarid regions.

The prevailing geographic, economic and social conditions of the nation play an important role in examining the efficient use of water.

In agriculture, water use efficiency may be defined quite. Water use in agriculture must become significantly more efficient if we hope to meet the food demands for 9 billion people by Since the demand for water for other uses is increasing it is unlikely that irrigation can be expanded significantly by The projected changes in irrigated areas show that in North America and Oceania.

Modeling irrigated agricultural production and water use decisions under water supply uncertainty Guilherme F. Marques Engenharia de Produc¸a˜o Civil, Centro Federal de Educac¸a˜o Tecnolo´gica, CEFET-MG, Minas Gerais, Brazil Jay R. Lund Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis, California, USA.

It describes the economic activity, technology, output, and inputs utilized by irrigated agriculture. It estimates demand and supply models of water use and irrigation, recognizing the role of institutional structures. It monitors trends over time and space to identify potential policy.

authors often cite the low elasticities of demand for irrigation water observed in many settings. When demand is price inelastic, quantity demanded declines by a smaller proportion than an increase in price, such that revenues collected from water users increase substantially, with little change in the volume of irrigation water used.

and practices, and cost. The variability of agricultural water use may continue as weather and climate patterns shift, thus changing water availability and demand in some areas.

Production of the national food supply represents one critical use for water in the U.S. However, agriculture is not the only important water consumer within a watershed.

energy intake. To date, irrigated agriculture supplies about 40 percent of the world’s food while accounting for only 17 percent of the cultivated land.

However, these positive outcomes have been achieved at a cost: Government support to irrigated agriculture included subsidization of infrastructure and inputs, especially water and power.

Optimal land and water resources allocation policies for sustainable irrigated agriculture. In irrigated agriculture, and interseasonal optimal cropping and water resources allocation policies under conjunctive use of surface water and ground water to supplement irrigation demand in a reservoir based irrigation system in eastern India Cited by: Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program The California Water Code authorizes the State and Regional Water Boards to issue waste discharge requirements (WDRs) or a waiver of waste discharge requirements (waivers) if it is in the public interest.

Over the years, the Regional Water Boards issued waivers for over 40 categories of discharges. water balance, which in turn forms the basis for predicting and peak irrigation supplies for general planning purposes.

Attention is given to irrigation efficiency and water requirements for cultural practices and leaching of salts. In Part methods are presented to arrive at File Size: 2MB. RESEARCH ARTICLE /WR Irrigation, risk aversion, and water right priority under water supply uncertainty Man Li1, Wenchao Xu2, and Mark W.

Rosegrant1 1Environment and Production Technology Division, International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, DC, USA, 2Department of Economics, School of Economics and WISE, Xiamen University, Xiamen, ChinaCited by: 4.

Water Demand - Agricultural Industrial water demand includes the amount of water used for manufacturing and production of commodities. For the purposes of this metric, industrial water use includes chemical, food, paper, wood, and metal production.

Industrial water comes from self-supplied surface and groundwater (e.g., private wells and. IMPROVING IRRIGATED AGRICULTURE PERFORMANCE THROUGH AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE WATER DELIVERY PROCESSy,z,1 ALBERT J.

CLEMMENS* U.S. Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center, Maricopa, Arizona, USA ABSTRACT The performance of large-scale irrigation projects worldwide has been disappointing to the international community. International Water Management Institute Modeling Water Allocation between Wetlands and Irrigated Agriculture SM WORKING PAPER 1 Postal Address Tel.

Fax E-mail Website P O Box Colombo Sri LankaSunil Mawatha Pelawatta Battaramulla Sri [email protected] Location SM IWMI is a Future. Crop response to water under irrigated conditions Introduction Before the dawn of recorded history, farmers had recognized that good water management meant higher crop yields.

Early civilizations were foun- ded on the stable food production systems that farmers had created through irrigation or other practices like controlled flooding and water. Under normal conditions, the annual total virtual water demand of sorghum (the dominant food crop in Sudan) is found to be 15 km3, of which 91% is green water.

During a dry year, however, Sudan could experience a deficit of km3 of water, necessitating the adoption of a .Irrigated agriculture is one of the major sectors that relies on fresh water from both ground and surface supplies. There is substantial use of recycled water across the United States, however there is a high potential for increased water reuse.Water quality as a limiting factor for irrigated agriculture.

SIMA BELIC, ANDELKA BELIC & MILICA VRANESEVIC. University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Water Management, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 8, Novi Sad, Serbia. [email protected] Abstract. Water quality for irrigation is evaluated for specific watercourses in.